Strapwork Ribbons

This is the warp that I’m currently working on. I’ve spliced in a piece of polyester satin ribbon on the loom, so that I can take off these pieces for finishing.

This is Gutermann silk sewing thread. It’s a very tightly twisted 3/100. It’s great for rendering this kind of small detail work. The long piece of strapwork on the right is going to be a neck-band for a name badge; it’s 28″ long in that one pattern. The other two pieces (and the remainder of the warp, about another 2 yards) will be bookmarks.

Closeup of the strapworks. The one in the middle is Celtic-style interlace; the other two are based on Renaissance trim patterns. The Renaissance trims are easy to do, since they follow a simple geometric repeat; the Celtic ones, I have to follow the chart line by line.

Closeup of the brocade designs. The brocading on these pieces is silk embroidery floss; the peacock feather is Kreinik Soie Platte, and the dragon is Zwicky multi-strand floss pulled down to a single strand. For some reason, the digital camera HATES the orange – it makes it look blurry, no matter how finely focused it may actually be.

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  1. random_girl
    random_girl says:

    That is just gorgeous. I especially like the peacock feather. My first though on seeing them was that you were making lanyards, but I’m guessing these have a higher intend purpose than to say, hold a security card for work.

  2. random_girl
    random_girl says:

    That is just gorgeous. I especially like the peacock feather. My first though on seeing them was that you were making lanyards, but I’m guessing these have a higher intend purpose than to say, hold a security card for work.

  3. admin
    admin says:

    Well, the short ones will be bookmarks – the long one will pretty much be a lanyard, though. I’m going to weave a lettered name tag, and I’m working with a silver-smithing friend to design the jewelry piece that will frame the name. I want something a little in-your-face for handweavers events – something that says, “Hi, my name is Michael” and at the same time says, “Hi, bow before my stunning virtuosity!”

  4. admin
    admin says:

    Well, the short ones will be bookmarks – the long one will pretty much be a lanyard, though. I’m going to weave a lettered name tag, and I’m working with a silver-smithing friend to design the jewelry piece that will frame the name. I want something a little in-your-face for handweavers events – something that says, “Hi, my name is Michael” and at the same time says, “Hi, bow before my stunning virtuosity!”

  5. hugh_mannity
    hugh_mannity says:

    Stunning. Absofuckinlutely stunning!

    It makes the band I’m so proud of look like novice work. Oh wait. My band *is* novice work — I don’t have to feel discouraged in the face of such beautiful work. 🙂

    Seriously — that is gorgeous and I aspire to do that quality work one of these days. You are a perpetual astonishment and inspiration.

  6. hugh_mannity
    hugh_mannity says:

    Stunning. Absofuckinlutely stunning!

    It makes the band I’m so proud of look like novice work. Oh wait. My band *is* novice work — I don’t have to feel discouraged in the face of such beautiful work. 🙂

    Seriously — that is gorgeous and I aspire to do that quality work one of these days. You are a perpetual astonishment and inspiration.

  7. admin
    admin says:

    Are you wanting to do tablet weaving, or Inkle weaving? I’m assuming it’s an inkle-type loom? Inkle is more straightforward; tablet has more design options. If you’re doing tablet, I can do a simple basic class in an hour or so.

  8. admin
    admin says:

    Are you wanting to do tablet weaving, or Inkle weaving? I’m assuming it’s an inkle-type loom? Inkle is more straightforward; tablet has more design options. If you’re doing tablet, I can do a simple basic class in an hour or so.

  9. fieryredhead
    fieryredhead says:

    I figure I’d start out with inkle weaving to get the hang of things as I’ve never done any of it before and then move onto the tablet if I can. 🙂

  10. fieryredhead
    fieryredhead says:

    I figure I’d start out with inkle weaving to get the hang of things as I’ve never done any of it before and then move onto the tablet if I can. 🙂

  11. admin
    admin says:

    Thanks! Yeah, getting to the point of being able to crank out this kind of stuff in sewing thread, was a few years of practice… you can get there if you want, though! I started working with sewing thread on the inkle loom pretty early, before I even touched tablets – it’s just smaller, it’s not more complicated.

  12. admin
    admin says:

    Thanks! Yeah, getting to the point of being able to crank out this kind of stuff in sewing thread, was a few years of practice… you can get there if you want, though! I started working with sewing thread on the inkle loom pretty early, before I even touched tablets – it’s just smaller, it’s not more complicated.

  13. hugh_mannity
    hugh_mannity says:

    it’s just smaller, it’s not more complicated

    That’s good to know, though right now it’s still pretty complicated.

    I did really well on Saturday though, I got in the groove and started to be able to read the pattern and not make mistakes — or catch them in progress and unmake them. I’ll post pictures soon.

  14. hugh_mannity
    hugh_mannity says:

    it’s just smaller, it’s not more complicated

    That’s good to know, though right now it’s still pretty complicated.

    I did really well on Saturday though, I got in the groove and started to be able to read the pattern and not make mistakes — or catch them in progress and unmake them. I’ll post pictures soon.

  15. admin
    admin says:

    What kind of pattern are you doing?

    I find that a lot of people who have done threaded-in patterns, are amazed to find how simple double-face is; reading the chart line by line is tedious, but it’s SO much simpler to thread up and get going.

  16. admin
    admin says:

    What kind of pattern are you doing?

    I find that a lot of people who have done threaded-in patterns, are amazed to find how simple double-face is; reading the chart line by line is tedious, but it’s SO much simpler to thread up and get going.

  17. esmerel
    esmerel says:

    My brain boggles at the level of detail you can get to in this kind of thing. I love knotwork lots and lots, but the dragon and the feather make me want to sit and pet the shiny shiny things for a long time 🙂

  18. esmerel
    esmerel says:

    My brain boggles at the level of detail you can get to in this kind of thing. I love knotwork lots and lots, but the dragon and the feather make me want to sit and pet the shiny shiny things for a long time 🙂

  19. admin
    admin says:

    EEp! Where do you find 00000000 needles? I’ve got 0000, but that’s the smallest I could find.

    Are you making something at 35 stitches per inch?

  20. admin
    admin says:

    EEp! Where do you find 00000000 needles? I’ve got 0000, but that’s the smallest I could find.

    Are you making something at 35 stitches per inch?

  21. sskipstress
    sskipstress says:

    I got the 8×0 needles at Lacis. I prefer the needles from Bag Lady because they are a little less flexible and have slightly rounder points, but the smallest size there is 6×0. BugKnits sells even smaller needles, but I haven’t tried them out yet.

    I entered a knitting competition, How Low Can You Go, 2 years ago. I started out with the 8×0 needles with silk sewing thread, but realized I wouldn’t be able to finish a 4″ x 4″ swatch in time, so I entered a piece on either 5×0 or 6×0 needles with silk top stitching thread (my favorite fingerloop braid thread) that was 25 sts/in.

    After that I started a tube at the 35 sts/in gauge that is a permanent part of the Knitting to a Period Gauge class that I teach occasionally in the SCA. It is my “this is smaller than you’ll ever need to work, but try it out just to see what it’s like” sample.

  22. sskipstress
    sskipstress says:

    I got the 8×0 needles at Lacis. I prefer the needles from Bag Lady because they are a little less flexible and have slightly rounder points, but the smallest size there is 6×0. BugKnits sells even smaller needles, but I haven’t tried them out yet.

    I entered a knitting competition, How Low Can You Go, 2 years ago. I started out with the 8×0 needles with silk sewing thread, but realized I wouldn’t be able to finish a 4″ x 4″ swatch in time, so I entered a piece on either 5×0 or 6×0 needles with silk top stitching thread (my favorite fingerloop braid thread) that was 25 sts/in.

    After that I started a tube at the 35 sts/in gauge that is a permanent part of the Knitting to a Period Gauge class that I teach occasionally in the SCA. It is my “this is smaller than you’ll ever need to work, but try it out just to see what it’s like” sample.

  23. sskipstress
    sskipstress says:

    The smallest I’ve made a real item was at 18 sts/in. Unfortunately, due to a miscalculation, that over-the-knee stocking didn’t fit, but it makes a great teaching tool. I’m holding off on making another one until I have a clearer idea of what kind of silk was used for stocking knitting in 15th and 16th century Europe, particularly Italy and Spain.

  24. sskipstress
    sskipstress says:

    The smallest I’ve made a real item was at 18 sts/in. Unfortunately, due to a miscalculation, that over-the-knee stocking didn’t fit, but it makes a great teaching tool. I’m holding off on making another one until I have a clearer idea of what kind of silk was used for stocking knitting in 15th and 16th century Europe, particularly Italy and Spain.

  25. hugh_mannity
    hugh_mannity says:

    It’s a threaded in pattern from Candace Crockett’s book. pattern draft 1 on page 68.

    This is my 2nd attempt at it. The first was the tangled Australian warp of Doom. Which I fully intend to untangle and make work, now I understand the structure of tablet weaving a lot better than I did.

  26. hugh_mannity
    hugh_mannity says:

    It’s a threaded in pattern from Candace Crockett’s book. pattern draft 1 on page 68.

    This is my 2nd attempt at it. The first was the tangled Australian warp of Doom. Which I fully intend to untangle and make work, now I understand the structure of tablet weaving a lot better than I did.

  27. vicki_sine
    vicki_sine says:

    You must be mellowing. I remember a time when you would have so paranoid about those edges on the peacock strap, you would have never actually photographed it.

    Teasing ya…I love the peacock feather…nice touch.

  28. vicki_sine
    vicki_sine says:

    You must be mellowing. I remember a time when you would have so paranoid about those edges on the peacock strap, you would have never actually photographed it.

    Teasing ya…I love the peacock feather…nice touch.

  29. admin
    admin says:

    Hee. Actually, I looked back at some of my old pieces – the edges aren’t that much neater, I just didn’t have a high-power macro.

  30. admin
    admin says:

    Hee. Actually, I looked back at some of my old pieces – the edges aren’t that much neater, I just didn’t have a high-power macro.

  31. admin
    admin says:

    The one thing I dislike most about Crockett’s book, is the way she warps. I learned from it, but it was an uphill struggle all the way. If you can possibly warp the cards under tension, you save yourself about 3/4 of the headache.

  32. admin
    admin says:

    The one thing I dislike most about Crockett’s book, is the way she warps. I learned from it, but it was an uphill struggle all the way. If you can possibly warp the cards under tension, you save yourself about 3/4 of the headache.

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